VIDEO NK Is A Distraction From India And China Border Conflict – Trump Wins Round One – Watch Iran

North Korea Is A Distraction From Border Conflict Between India And China

 Aug 9, 2017

Steve Pieczenik joins Adam Curry and Alex Jones via Skype to discuss how the North Korea nuclear situation is a psy-op to distract the public from the border conflict between China and India.


Donald Trump Wins Round One with North Korea

11 Aug 2017 by Joel B. Pollak

The mainstream media are aghast at President Donald Trump’s comments on North Korea as he promises “fire and fury” and warns that American military solutions are “locked and loaded.”

The political elite, and the foreign policy establishment, oscillate between bitter scorn and sheer panic at his tactics. But one does not have to be convinced of Trump’s rhetorical genius to note that he has already re-framed the conflict in a way that is advantageous to the U.S.

First, Trump has radically changed the costs of a potential conflict, for both sides. The dominant paradigm of nuclear face-offs is mutually assured destruction (MAD), which is why the Soviet Union and the U.S. never attacked each other during the Cold War. Most of the discussion about North Korea has followed the same pattern, because of the threat of ICBMs to the U.S. mainland. After Trump threatened to annihilate North Korea, however, Kim Jong-un threatened to attack … Guam. Trump doubled down, indicating that a North Korean attack on Guam would trigger an attack against the regime. That shifted the costs of a war radically in our favor and against theirs.

Second, it is noteworthy that the North Korean threat to Guam did not refer to nuclear weapons, but rather hinted at conventional missile strikes. There is no way to know for sure that the regime would not use nuclear weapons, if indeed the North Koreans can miniaturize them, but a conventional attack is certainly less serious than a nuclear one. In threatening the most violent possible attack, Trump elicited a response that is significantly less threatening.

Third, Trump diverted attention away from North Korea’s more vulnerable neighbors, South Korea and Japan. Of course the North Koreans could attack them if the U.S. launched a war. But instead of talking about the potential deaths of millions of people in densely-populated areas, the world is now talking about the qualms felt by a few people on a remote island. That makes Trump’s words look less scary, and eases pressure for the U.S. to back down.

Update: Fourth, the Chinese government is now indicating that it will not defend North Korea from a retaliatory strike if the regime attacks the U.S. (which includes Guam). The Global Times, which reflects the view of the Chinese government, indicated that China would stop the U.S. from trying to overthrow the North Korean regime but would not defend North Korea if it struck the U.S. first. That is a significant change from the status quo ante.

The situation remains unstable, and could escalate. But Trump’s rhetoric is not, as former Obama adviser Susan Rice claims, the problem. In fact, it is part of the solution. It has, at the very least, restored some of our deterrence.

Joel B. Pollak is Senior Editor-at-Large at Breitbart News. He was named one of the “most influential” people in news media in 2016. He is the co-author of How Trump Won: The Inside Story of a Revolution, is available from Regnery. Follow him on Twitter at @joelpollak.

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/08/11/donald-trump-wins-round-north-korea/


 

Security Experts Worry Iran May Try To Follow North Korea’s Lead

“… resistance against U.S. bullying.”

 

Recent news that North Korea now possesses the capability to miniaturize a nuclear warhead and fit it onto an intercontinental ballistic missile has security experts worried Iran may attempt to follow suit, believing itself safe from repercussions.

“The concern, some say, is that Tehran will see that if North Korea can get away with building a nuclear weapon in spite of U.S. protests, then it can, too,” CNBC’s Jason Gerwitz reported.

Among those distressed about how North Korea’s behavior might influence Iran is Michael O’Hanlon, a Brookings Institution specialist in defense strategy.

Recent news that North Korea now possesses the capability to miniaturize a nuclear warhead and fit it onto an intercontinental ballistic missile has security experts worried Iran may attempt to follow suit, believing itself safe from repercussions.

“The concern, some say, is that Tehran will see that if North Korea can get away with building a nuclear weapon in spite of U.S. protests, then it can, too,” CNBC’s Jason Gerwitz reported.

Among those distressed about how North Korea’s behavior might influence Iran is Michael O’Hanlon, a Brookings Institution specialist in defense strategy.

“What lessons will Iran draw if North Korea gets away with not only getting a bomb, but building up continuously with China and Russia tolerating it?” O’Hanlon said.

Adding to concerns is the fact Pyongyang’s second most-senior leader, Kim Yong-nam, is currently on a 10-day trip to the Iranian capital of Tehran, where so far he’s attended re-elected Iranian President Hasan Rouhani’s inauguration ceremony, met with a number of senior Iran officials and inaugurated a new embassy.

Moreover, during a meeting with Kim late last week, Iranian parliamentary speaker Ali Larijani praised North Korea for its “praiseworthy resistance against U.S. bullying.”

In response, the North Korean official declared “Tehran and Pyongyang have a common enemy” in the United States and essentially encouraged the Islamic nation in its own aggressive and provocative behavior.

“The Islamic Republic of Iran has stated that no authorization is required for the building and firing of missiles, and we support this strong position,” he said.

Former U.S. Ambassador Ed Walker said the Trump administration must not allow its current focus on North Korea to distract its attention from Iran.

“As soon as you start distracting U.S. efforts to contain Iran, that frees up space for Iran to move forward with its nuclear program,” Walker told CNBC, adding that if the administration cannot manage this, “they should quit and go home.”

He also criticized the president’s failure to fill all the open positions at the Department of State.

“President Trump has put himself at a terrible disadvantage by leaving key posts at the State Department unfilled and by not hiring qualified staff fast enough,” he said.

http://www.westernjournalism.com/security-experts-worry-iran-may-try-follow-north-koreas-lead/

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About ror1774

This Blog is for modern day Patriots who want to Reclaim Our Republic and put it on the right path with a foundation of our Constitution and our Creator God.
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